1. Returning... the Dream Journey by Marissa Carlisle
1. Returning... the Dream Journey by Marissa Carlisle
2. Muckraker by Matt Gil
2. Muckraker by Matt Gil
3. Air by Ulises Meza
3. Air by Ulises Meza
4. Nobori by Loren Madsen
4. Nobori by Loren Madsen
5. Napa Sunflower by Patricia Vader
5. Napa Sunflower by Patricia Vader
6. Freewheelin' by James Haire
6. Freewheelin' by James Haire
7. Rookie by Matt Gil
7. Rookie by Matt Gil
8. Spiral Insect by Patricia Vader
8. Spiral Insect by Patricia Vader
9. Ta-Dah! by C.J. Rench
9. Ta-Dah! by C.J. Rench
10. Cha Cha Cha by Robin Murez / 2011-2013 PEOPLE'S CHOICE WINNER
10. Cha Cha Cha by Robin Murez / 2011-2013 PEOPLE'S CHOICE WINNER
11. Fish 'On' by Terence Martin / 2009-2011 PEOPLE'S CHOICE WINNER
11. Fish 'On' by Terence Martin / 2009-2011 PEOPLE'S CHOICE WINNER
12. Belknap's Bow by Andrew Ferrales
12. Belknap's Bow by Andrew Ferrales
13. Continuum by Jeff Zischke
13. Continuum by Jeff Zischke
14. Wind Arcs by Eric Furman
14. Wind Arcs by Eric Furman
1. Returning... the Dream Journey by Marissa Carlisle
1. Returning... the Dream Journey by Marissa Carlisle Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} Returning.. the dream journey//  Marissa Carlisle  //  steel//  2011Napa artist Marissa Carlisle created 'Returning…The Dream Journey' to reflect her interests in anthropology and the study of world cultures. 'The Dream Journey' is culturally specific to Australia. In the piece she includes cabled boomerangs, the wooden toy that always returns to their starting point. She explains, "as the cables sway, they make a harmonic noise similar to the sounds of Australia’s most known musical instrument—the didgeridoo. The bouncing flexibility of the sculpture references kangaroos. And last, the black and white bandings represent Australia’s long journey of integrating its indigenous and modern day cultural heritages." 
2. Muckraker by Matt Gil
2. Muckraker by Matt Gil Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} Muckraker//  Matt Gil  //  aluminum, stainless steel, paint//  2008Matt Gil says he designed 'Muckraker' as a "large vertical monolith shaped like an aircraft" with minimal shapes stacked vertically between open spaces or 'voids'. When discussing the piece (or "Rookie", his other sculpture in this Napa ARTwalk exhibition), he says he was inspired by the modern sculptural language used by, "in particular Donald Judd, as well as Brancusi's work from the early last century", continuing to explain that for him, "Judd’s use of multiple open steel boxes stacked on a wall was a monumental art idea". Gil says he wanted to "build a free-standing outdoor sculpture that was vertical and open; to feel like it was classic yet modern at the same time;  to command attention and have an elegant simplicity. I realized after designing and building this piece that it represented my artistic roadblock that I had to break though as an artist to make my own way. I painted (it) black to stand out in the landscape like all the great Calder sculpture". Before it was part of the Napa ARTwalk, "Muckraker" was exhibited in a solo show at Marx & Zavattero Gallery in San Francisco (2010) and at the San Jose Museum of Art (2009).
3. Air by Ulises Meza
3. Air by Ulises Meza Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} Air//  Ulises Meza  //  steel//  2011Artist Ulises Meza says his sculpture, 'Air', "explores line and movement... I enjoy the lyrical quality of the steel rod. It reminds me of the flowing quality of great line drawings that seem to mesmerize the viewer." Explaining his creative process, Meza says he works as spontaneously as the materials will let him. "It is through the bending and moving of the steel that one begins to appreciate its soft qualities. Composition is a work in progress while creating a piece like this. Each line provides clues to where the next line should be placed..." In terms of subject matter, he is "interested in toys and objects associated with play. I am also interested in examining images that we consider to be nostalgic. The airplanes are toy size but they also represent real objects. It is a disarming image that has a playful aura about it, but it also represents conflict." He chose the specific Corsair and Zero airplanes for the piece to reference WWII. "I find that people have a great nostalgic reaction to objects they perceive to be from that time period. I am interested in the idea of using these toy airplanes to mentally reenact a dog fight in the viewer’s mind." 
4. Nobori by Loren Madsen
4. Nobori by Loren Madsen Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} Nobori//  Loren Madsen  //  pine, fir, various hardwoods//  2010A 'nobori' is a type of samurai battle flag which carried circles and lines as instructions for the troops in the field. Loren Madsen says his sculpture of the same name "plays with the ideas of flags and symbols and emulates the motions of the flags and banners". This two-piece sculpture is made of pine with redwood, purple heart and walnut inlays and splints.
5. Napa Sunflower by Patricia Vader
5. Napa Sunflower by Patricia VaderNapa Sunflower//  Patricia Vader//  wind-activated stainless steel, aluminum//  2011Growing up in Holland, artist Patricia Vader woke up each morning to her poster of Van Gogh’s sunflowers. Her childhood memories, as well as the sunflower garden at her own home (now in the Bay Area), inspired her to create what she calls "a genetically engineered variety of the flower... a purely mechanical version". She built her sunflowers as "eight windmills made out of bicycle wheels with canted disks" and mounted road reflectors on the wheels to flare up at night.
6. Freewheelin' by James Haire
6. Freewheelin' by James Haire Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}Freewheelin'  //  James Haire//  bronze, stainless steel//  1991SOLD during exhibition to private collectorArtist James Haire constructed his piece, 'Freewheelin', a life-size sculpture of a woman riding a bike, out of bronze and stainless steel. He says, "while the sculpture has no moving parts, there is still a feeling of movement in the piece by the absence of spokes in the wheels."
7. Rookie by Matt Gil
7. Rookie by Matt Gil Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}Rookie//  Matt Gil//  aluminum, stainless steel fastenings//  2010'Rookie' artist Matt Gil says, "when I design a sculpture I do not have a title in mind for it. I personally fabricate all my work in my studio in San Francisco and display it for a while in my studio sculpture garden. I look at it for a while and then realize what it means to me." As with his other piece in this exhibition, "Muckraker", Gil says he is inspired by the modern sculptural language of artists like Donald Judd and Brancusi.
8. Spiral Insect by Patricia Vader
8. Spiral Insect by Patricia Vader Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}Spiral Insect//  Patricia Vader//  wind-activated stainless steel, aluminumArtist Patricia Vader grew up in Holland with windmills and bicycles. These two objects that twist and twirl in the wind are now the driving forces of her sculptures. 'Spiral Insect' got its spiral framework from a discarded kids’ playground structure that Patricia expanded on. It is is made up of 16 windmills that represent the eyes and antennae. The windmills are made out of bicycle wheels with canted disks, which spin in different directions (clockwise and counterclockwise) depending on the direction of the wind and the orientation of the disks. For additional motion effect, the two top pairs of windmills are mounted on bicycle forks which gyrate on their own vertical axis. In the daylight, the unpainted disks reflect the sunlight in spectacular flashes. Come back at night when the eyes—with road reflectors mounted on each disk—light up in car headlights and other light sources.
9. Ta-Dah! by C.J. Rench
9. Ta-Dah! by C.J. Rench Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}Ta-Dah!  //  C.J. Rench//  powder-coated mild steel//  2009Born in Illinois, C.J. Rench began as a self-taught industrial engineer and product designer in the sporting goods industry. Over the course of his career, he has been awarded multiple patents for his innovative designs. In 2005, Rench began work as a full-time sculptor, designing metal sculptures and working mainly with large-scale abstract designs. His past design work and entrepreneurial spirit have had a meaningful impact on his art. He primarily works in stainless and mild steel, ranging in scale from small tabletop sculptures to monumental public installations. Rench has produced dozens of large-scale commission works for public and personal collectors throughout the Pacific Northwest.
10. Cha Cha Cha by Robin Murez / 2011-2013 PEOPLE'S CHOICE WINNER
10. Cha Cha Cha by Robin Murez / 2011-2013 PEOPLE'S CHOICE WINNER Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}Cha Cha Cha//  Robin Murez//  steelSOLD / CURRNET LOCATION: Remains on view on East side of the Napa Riverfront"ONE, TWO, Cha Cha Cha. ONE, TWO, Cha Cha Cha... it's a familiar rhythm," says artist Robin Murez. To participate in her sculpture, she asks viewers to stand on the footsteps marked “start here. and then "see where the map directs your feet by following the numbers." The viewer themselves then "creates the kinetic motion as they move to the rhythm, alone or with a partner. Enjoy the challenge. Sing the tune. Remember the first time you danced the Cha Cha Cha. Close your eyes. You can be Fred Astaire or Ginger Rogers. Let yourself dance on the banks of the Napa River."
11. Fish 'On' by Terence Martin / 2009-2011 PEOPLE'S CHOICE WINNER
11. Fish 'On' by Terence Martin / 2009-2011 PEOPLE'S CHOICE WINNER Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}Fish 'On'  //  Terence Martin//  mild steel  //  2006SOLD / CURRENT LOCATION: On the Riverfront walkway behind the Napa River Inn after the hotel owner purchased it. MAPPart of the prize for winning the first People’s Choice Prize (for the 2009-2011 program), ‘FishOn’ remained on view in Napa for two more years. Terence Martin's steel sculpture, "Fish On", was the People's Choice winner for this first Napa ARTwalk program. He made individual scales for the large mouth bass by cutting and joining them together from the inside around an internal steel frame. Then he added color with a blow-torch. The final finish is an automotive-based clear coat, with rainbow pearl additives. Martin says, “600 pounds of metal can talk. Really. It moves, it sings, it's fluid, it's delicate - and the most amazing thing about metal is that it makes PEOPLE talk. And move. Maybe even sing, too.” Martin seeks out environmentally-friendly recycled materials, in addition to using the environment as the inspirational framework for his sculptures. He says his piece "is a multifaceted sculpture that spans generations and cultures. It is art that is accessible to all and exclusive to none. By selecting elements from earth and nature, as well as metaphors for the human experience, the images are at once recognizable and tangible objects that appeal to all walks of life."Image by Israel Valencia, Infinity Visuals
12. Belknap's Bow by Andrew Ferrales
12. Belknap's Bow by Andrew Ferrales Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}Belknap's Bow//  Andrew Ferrales//  steel, natural rust patina//  2010Artist Andrew Ferrales describes his piece 'Belknap's Bow' as a "dynamic design in a subtle composition." He says the piece "focuses on negative space and the interaction of the two sculptural forms... implying motion and functionality." Ferrales' process begins on paper as sketches he later develops using a 3-D computer modeling program. After that, he "takes the plans and specifications to the studio where it was all created by hand by rolling, cutting, grinding, and welding." He fabricated the sculpture from sheet steel, which he describes as "an excellent material for translating complex geometric forms from paper into our everyday life." When the form was complete, Ferrales finished it with a natural rust patina to allow steel to show off its beautiful natural quality."
13. Continuum by Jeff Zischke
13. Continuum by Jeff Zischke Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}Continuum//  Jeff Zischke//  steel//  2009'Continuum' by Jeff Zischke features eight steel legs that splay out from its center, walking in a continuous line. Zischke says his sculpture "was inspired by the Triskelion, an ancient Greek symbol that represents continual progress. The symbol was displayed on early Greek coins and pottery. It is also integrated into the coat of arms for The Isle of Man."
14. Wind Arcs by Eric Furman
14. Wind Arcs by Eric Furman Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}Wind Arcs//  Eric Furman//  aluminum, stainless steel fastenings//  2011Artist Eric Furman says, "We humans are stimuli junkies and I, as an artist, am a seeker of motion. We can’t see the wind, but we can see objects moved by a breeze." He describes his piece, 'Wind Arcs' as "four shades of red, from a dark red vane to an almost pumpkin orange upper arc. It is made completely from aluminum with stainless steel fastenings. Over 20 feet tall, the sculpture weighs less than 120 pounds. Designed to celebrate the futuristic action forms of the 1920s, the three arcs rise 15 feet to support a 12 foot ultra-light wind vane. The springy arcs can sway up to 5 feet at their peak while the vane rotates. The vane itself is fabricated from 13 pieces of bent and riveted aluminum sheet. Weighing only 56 ounces and pivoting on stainless steel ball bearings, it moves easily about a tilted axis in the lightest breeze." He continues saying, "as I watch the vane’s erratic rotation, I wonder, 'How can such constant action be so unpredictable?' To me, the vane’s motion reflects the irrepressible dynamism of human experience. My hope is that you, the viewer, receive as much pleasure from watching Wind Arcs action as I did from creating it."
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