1. Untitled (Linear Form I-Beam Series, LF-17-00/10) by John G. Luebtow
1. Untitled (Linear Form I-Beam Series, LF-17-00/10) by John G. Luebtow
2. Beetle Shadow by John King
2. Beetle Shadow by John King
3. Skiff by Eric Powell
3. Skiff by Eric Powell
4. Napa River Stele by Ann Shelby Valentine
4. Napa River Stele by Ann Shelby Valentine
5. Homage to Our Native Roots by Carlos Zamora
5. Homage to Our Native Roots by Carlos Zamora
6. Bird by Riis Burwell
6. Bird by Riis Burwell
7. Chinook Resurrection by Adrian Litman
7. Chinook Resurrection by Adrian Litman
8. Fish 'On' by Terence Martin / PEOPLE'S CHOICE WINNER
8. Fish 'On' by Terence Martin / PEOPLE'S CHOICE WINNER
9. Via Regia by Stephen Fitz-Gerald
9. Via Regia by Stephen Fitz-Gerald
10. The Throne by Nicky Falkenhayn
10. The Throne by Nicky Falkenhayn
1. Untitled (Linear Form I-Beam Series, LF-17-00/10) by John G. Luebtow
1. Untitled (Linear Form I-Beam Series, LF-17-00/10) by John G. LuebtowUntitled (Linear Form I-Beam Series, LF-17-00/10)  //  John Luebtow  //  glass, stainless base, steel I-Beam  //  2000 Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} SOLD to private collector during exhibitionJohn G. Luebtow created this sculpture, "Untitled," in 2000 as one of a series of Linear Form I-Beam sculptures. It stands 10 feet tall and is made from 1” thick annealed glass, stainless steel, and a steel I-Beam. Luebtow chose to work with five pieces of annealed glass, formed by an undulating kiln, to mimic the movement of water. The steel I-Beam supporting the glass is meant to echo the confines of movement made by a riverbank. Luebtow’s investigation of linear forms is common throughout his body of work. While his sculptures are technically controlled, he often plays with scale and movement within the work to create visually imposing structures that encourage the viewer’s own self-reflections. In Untitled, the manipulated glass, representing the river, allows the viewer to see Luebtow’s playful investigation of line and movement. In his piece, the glass, similar to water, reflects its environment and its viewing audience, allowing all on-lookers the chance to catch a glimpse of themselves within Luebtow’s simulated river. 
2. Beetle Shadow by John King
2. Beetle Shadow by John King Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} Beetle Shadow  //  John King, Eureka  //  concrete  // 2002'Beetle Shadow' stands 6 feet tall and is made from concrete, with in-layed fossils. King’s work is greatly influenced by evolution and the cycle of life. In this sculpture, King focused specifically on capturing a forgotten moment in time, using various aquatic and other types of fossil images to depict the impermanence of life. As he explains, “Time flows forward and moves on, leaving shadows from the past.” King is interested in atomic exploration and the chemical restructuring of the universe and often explores these ideas and the Earth’s genetic heritage in his work.
3. Skiff by Eric Powell
3. Skiff by Eric Powell Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} Skiff  //  Eric Powell  //  steel  //  2010Eric Powell's sculpture depicts the iconic form of a river-going vessel crafted by civilizations from around the world, including the Wappo tribe native to the Napa Valley. Powell says, "the ribs of the vessel evoke forms from the human body, revealing how design is so often inspired by nature. The open pods that live inside the vessel represent the living pulse of the body and of the river, as well as passengers on their river journey. " Powell explains that he "designs and fabricates unique contemporary metal sculpture for both public spaces and private commissions, from unique gates and sculpture to large-scale public art projects." For over 20 years, he has "developed an intimate knowledge of the unique properties of metal and have found that despite its resistance to change, it is infinitely malleable. Through a process that requires both discipline and flexibility, steel and bronze can come to exist in a multitude of forms that exude strength and durability." He considers his studio is a laboratory, a workshop and a factory. "It is a place to learn and teach and to refine and deepen the sacred act of making something with one’s own hands."
4. Napa River Stele by Ann Shelby Valentine
4. Napa River Stele by Ann Shelby Valentine Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} Napa River Stele  //  Ann Shelby Valentine  //  pique assiette mosaic  //  2010Artist Ann Shelby Valentine says that "from a distance, the bold composition of The Napa River Stele depicts the continual line of the Napa River: from snow fed streams on the five peaks of Mt. St. Helena to its tawny flow into San Pablo Bay." But up close, her pique assiette mosaic "depicts infinite details including wildlife and fields of native wildflowers, especially a Matilija poppy, California poppies and the recently restored sticky yellow monkey flower near the old Silverado Mine." Valentine's 'Stele' celebrates the Napa River as it winds down the length of Napa Valley past the Calistoga Geyser, numerous vineyards, indigenous Wappo village sites, the historic Bale Grist Mill, vibrant tourism (represented by hot air balloons), the maritime heritage of Mare Island and restored marshland habitat with pickleweed and mosquitoes plus returning steelhead and salmon." She says she repurposed a "great variety of shards of china, pottery, tile and objets trouvés - all recycled, 'rescued-from-the-dump', salvaged material prized for its potential to still bring many years of visual delight." The piece is made of cement materials, over a lightweight core and rebar. Valentine asks the viewer to "see if you can find: a frog; a wine bottle; a cherub’s head; a girl’s head with a purple bonnet; cup handles (there are 2); a teapot spout; a turtle; little fish (there are 3); a whale; a pot lid; a bowl bottom; a bird figurine; a swan figurine; a bear; an owl; a duck’s head."
5. Homage to Our Native Roots by Carlos Zamora
5. Homage to Our Native Roots by Carlos Zamora Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} Homage to Our Native Roots  //  Carlos Zamora  //  marble  //  2010Artist Carlos Zamora created two marble totems together entitled, 'Homage to our Native Roots'. He says his piece is meant to "describe a mythical story beginning with the inhabitants of air, earth, and water; creatures that swim, walk, crawl, and fly as they trace our history. Their ideas, memories and interpretations underlie the secrets of life that have been passed down through time." By reinventing traditional forms, such as bowls turned upside down, Zamora challenges the viewer "to see with their hearts," as he puts it. Covered with pre-Columbian symbols, Zamora wants to "relay the messages of beings who lived in the splendor of the past" In these totems, Zamora seeks to "give these beautiful designs rebirth in physical representation again." To find these huge blocks of marble, he went to the mines of Selva Alegre, Ecuador. Sculpting each stone with total focus and reverent care, he returned many times for additional blocks.  Looking at the work, the top piece shows an indigenous face "reflecting the sadness and tragedy of his people." He originally designed it to be a fountain, with atomized water emitting a mist from the crown and shooting water up in a rainbow arch, but due to the long installation period, this part of the sculptures remains silent. He says that the two symmetrical birds "represent the unity of life."Image by J.L. Sousa, Napa Valley Register/ Published 6.21.10
6. Bird by Riis Burwell
6. Bird by Riis Burwell Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} Bird  //  Riis Burwell  //  bronze, stainless steel  //  2005Riis Burwell says his sculpture “Bird” was inspired by Constantin Brancusi’s sculpture, “Bird in Space,” and by jazz musician Charlie Parker (known affectionately to his fans as 'Bird'). “My sculpture is an exploration – emotional, spiritual and physical of what is both seen and unseen in nature," Burwell explains. "Charlie Parker strove throughout his career to push musical boundaries beyond established limits. His work was forever fluid and free. In 'Bird', the central bronze form symbolically and literally grows out of the constraints of its surrounding environment, much as a river flows and expands, pushing against the banks that seek to restrain and shape it. Art, nature, and beautiful music provide the sculpture with an ever-abiding link to the natural."
7. Chinook Resurrection by Adrian Litman
7. Chinook Resurrection by Adrian Litman Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} Chinook Resurrection  //  Adrian Litman  //  brushed aluminum, steel  //  2010Artist Adrian Litman created 'Chinook Resurrection' in 2010. The welded steel sculpture stands 30 feet at its tallest point. Litman says "it is a representation of the Chinook salmon that are protected under the endangered species program". He created the final shape with anodized aluminum 'skins' that have been riveted on to the steel body. Image: Arts Council Napa Valley staff leading an Artwalk tour for Blue Oak students
8. Fish 'On' by Terence Martin / PEOPLE'S CHOICE WINNER
8. Fish 'On' by Terence Martin / PEOPLE'S CHOICE WINNER Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} Fish 'On'  //  Terence Martin  //  mild steel  //  2006CURRENT LOCATION: On the Riverfront walkway behind the Napa River Inn after the hotel owner purchased it. MAPTerence Martin's steel sculpture, "Fish On", was the People's Choice winner for this first Napa ARTwalk program. He made individual scales for the large mouth bass by cutting and joining them together from the inside around an internal steel frame. Then he added color with a blow-torch. The final finish is an automotive-based clear coat, with rainbow pearl additives. Martin says, “600 pounds of metal can talk. Really. It moves, it sings, it's fluid, it's delicate - and the most amazing thing about metal is that it makes PEOPLE talk. And move. Maybe even sing, too.” Martin seeks out environmentally-friendly recycled materials, in addition to using the environment as the inspirational framework for his sculptures. He says his piece "is a multifaceted sculpture that spans generations and cultures. It is art that is accessible to all and exclusive to none. By selecting elements from earth and nature, as well as metaphors for the human experience, the images are at once recognizable and tangible objects that appeal to all walks of life."Image by Israel Valencia, Infinity Visuals
9. Via Regia by Stephen Fitz-Gerald
9. Via Regia by Stephen Fitz-Gerald Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} Via Regia  //  Stephen Fitz-Gerald  //  stainless steel  //  2006Inspired by Sigmund Freud’s statement that, "Dreams are the royal road to the subconscious," artist Stephen Fitz-Gerald created his steel sculpture, "Via Regia," meaning "royal road" in Latin. Fitz-Gerald says it is an homage to his own dreams, explaining that "in the field of dream interpretation, smooth, flowing rivers indicate the promise of pleasure and prosperity." He continues to explain that "Via Regia", resting alongside the Napa River, creates a harmonious duality of two royal roads: one steel and one water, both of which lead to a new and unexplored futures. Fitz-Gerald is the son of master sculptor Clark Fitz-Gerald, who has remained his greatest creative influence.
10. The Throne by Nicky Falkenhayn
10. The Throne by Nicky Falkenhayn Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} The Throne  //  Nicky Falkenhayn  //  cor-ten steel, stacked glass  //  2008Artist Nicky Falkenhayn used rusty Cor-ten steel and cut stacked glass to create 'The Throne'. Both are favorite sculpture materials for Falkenhayn, based on their "elegant natural colors." She says that she “truly enjoys molten metal sparks flying about when welding or grinding steel. Figuring out the engineering of a sculpture is equally satisfying to me as making it. 'The Throne' was designed to be a 'Royal Seat' to celebrate the meeting point of water, sky and earth." The placement of "The Throne," overlooking the Napa River, allows and encourages viewers to view the local landscape in an entirely new way while seated on the sculpture. Falkenhayn says she strives for "simplicity, grace, and harmony in both her own space and in her work." Image by J.L. Sousa, Napa Valley Register/ Published 6.21.10
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